Reflections on the Psalms by CS Lewis [REVIEW]

SYNOPSIS

A repackaged edition of the revered author’s moving theological work in which he considers the most poetic portions from Scripture and what they tell us about God, the Bible, and faith.

In this wise and enlightening book, C. S. Lewis—the great British writer, scholar, lay theologian, broadcaster, Christian apologist, and bestselling author of Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce, The Chronicles of Narnia, and many other beloved classics—examines the Psalms. As Lewis divines the meaning behind these timeless poetic verses, he makes clear their significance in our daily lives, and reminds us of their power to illuminate moments of grace.

REVIEW

In reading this book, I was reminded how important it is to read things in context. In doing so, one must also study the related and supporting scriptures. It is quite alright to take an extended period of time in study of a single verse, section or chapter. Let the Spirit guide you and you will never go wrong.

8 comments

  1. After a lifetime of personal study, I find context to be foundational for a single thought.
    Scripture taken out of context can be misleading.
    Thank you for the reminder.

    Liked by 4 people

  2. I remember when I “discovered” C.S. Lewis, I read fourteen of his books in one semester, and this was one of them. Now, 45 years later, I still remember some of his most profound insights from some of the most puzzling verses in Psalms. Example, Psalm 139:8-9, that speaks of Babylon, and happy is “he who seizes your infants and dashes them against the rocks.” Lewis suggested that since Babylon is a picture of sin, we need to seize those “little” sins and destroy them before they become big sins and destroy us. The same concept as the lizard in “The Great Divorce.”

    Kill It!

    Liked by 3 people

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