TACKLING THE TABOO Navigating Anxiety, Depression, And Other Mental Illnesses As A Christian by Terica Turner

SYNOPSIS

Over 50 million Americans — including Christians — struggle with mental illness.

Many struggle in silence, but it does not have to be that way. While some espouse the belief that Christians should not have anxiety, depression, or other mental health issues, that simply is not reality. Having mental health concerns is not the result of a lackluster relationship with God. Nor is it a gauge of one’s spirituality. Being sick mentally is more akin to having a physical ailment that we need to learn to understand and treat if possible.

This book will encourage you to:

  • Consider myths surrounding mental health concerns and their truthfulness;
  • Study Biblical characters who likely dealt with mental health issues;
  • Learn from the author’s own experiences with mental illness;
  • Use different resources to cope with depression, anxiety, and other mental health concerns;
  • Develop a suicide safety plan and make a commitment to live; and,
  • Have open dialogues with our family and friends about depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts.

This book delivers vivid connections with the author’s life experiences — providing details about her own struggles — and the Scriptures that give us hope as we navigate mental health issues. After reading this book, you will be better equipped to handle mental health concerns for yourself and those you love and have a better understanding of how Christians can cope with mental illness

REVIEW

There is a difference between mental illness and spiritual warfare. We must be careful not to assume that if a mentally ill person was a better Christian their infirmity will disappear.

I read this book in one sitting (about an hour). It would be helpful for individuals who are struggling with their own mental illness as well as those who have a loved one who is battling depression, anxiety or other mental health crisis.

The discussion questions at the end of each chapter are a great springboard to an open honest dialogue, whether you are the “afflicted” or the “concerned bystander”.

Sweeping mental illness under the rug doesn’t help anyone. Step out in faith and do something about it.

The author, Terica Turner, also blogs at Christ Leads the Way

You can get your ebook copy today for only $0.99. Yes, 99 cents!!! It’s only for a limited time, so download your copy here.

7 comments

  1. ❤️ I would say, I agree in the assessment of the author that being a better Christian isn’t the answer. I know this because my wife grew up in a religious lifestyle with her Dad as a Lutheran Pastor. She regularly either views church online or goes, she regularly prays, asks God for guidance with her rosary beads at night, is the most charitable person I ever met and yet she is afflicted with being bipolar. Her treatment is rigorous and yet she still has moments when she falls off path (our current situation).

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Amen to this, Barb! –> “Having mental health concerns is not the result of a lackluster relationship with God. Nor is it a gauge of one’s spirituality. Being sick mentally is more akin to having a physical ailment that we need to learn to understand and treat if possible.” Too often I hear sermons preached that having depression or anxiety is a lack of faith. It just adds more stigma to those suffering with it.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Interesting one and quite controversial. I work in and around therapies and there are so many links and cross overs between the mental, psychological and spiritual. Conversations about mental health and well-being are important in religious spaces. Bless you.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thank you so much for your kind and gracious review! I really appreciate it! It’s so important that we shed light on these topics, and I thank you for sharing this and playing a part in removing the stigma associated with mental health. 💜😊

    Liked by 1 person

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